Mothers should NOT 'vaginal seed' their babies: Transferring those body fluids could give them deadly bacteria

 

Mothers should not 'vaginal seed' their babies as transferring genitalia fluid to infants born via c-section could give them life-threatening chlamydia, an expert warns.
Some believe 'seeding', which involves smearing babies born non-vaginally with such fluid, exposes them to the vital micro-organisms they missed out on in the birth canal.
Yet, Dr Christopher Zahn from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists warns mothers who unknowingly carry often symptomless STIs like 'silent' chlamydia could transmit the infection to their newborns, which can cause
fatal pneumonia.
This risk outweighs the insufficient evidence suggesting exposure to 'good' bacteria in the birth canal reduces a baby's risk of developing conditions like asthma and allergies in later life, Dr Zahn said.
He added: 'Understandably, patients who may need to undergo a c-section are increasingly seeking counsel from ob-gyns on whether vaginal seeding is appropriate. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, the very real risks outweigh the potential benefits.'

Some believe exposing babies to the micro-organisms in vaginal fluid stimulates their immune systems, reducing their later risk of suffering conditions such as asthma and allergies.
When born via c-section, youngsters miss out on this exposure, prompting some mothers to vaginally seed their children by smearing their genitalia discharge across their baby's face. 
Dr Zahn warns the act could infect children with the bacteria responsible for chlamydia and gonorrhea if their mothers are unaware they have an STI.
Mothers could also potentially transmit the herpes virus, which can be symptomless in adults but fatal in newborns if it spreads to their organs.
These pathogens can also be transmitted to children born vaginally, however, the risk is more apparent when the infected fluid is directly applied to babies' faces.
According to new guidelines issued by the ACOG, there is insufficient evidence to suggest vaginal births substantially reduce the risk of babies later developing conditions like asthma over c-section deliveries, with genetics and diet likely also playing a role.
Chlamydia is known as the 'silent infection' as it often causes no symptoms, or merely induces heavy discharge or more frequent urination. 
Gonorrhoea also causes fairly generic symptoms such as abdominal tenderness and a change in vaginal discharge.

Dr Zahn said: 'Understandably, patients who may need to undergo a c-section are increasingly seeking counsel from ob-gyns on whether vaginal seeding is appropriate. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, the very real risks outweigh the potential benefits.'
He recommends women help c-section born babies overcome their lack of vaginal fluid exposure by exclusively breastfeeding them for the first six months.
Dr Zahn said: 'The bacteria present in breast milk and on the nipple is sufficient for natural colonization or seeding of the gut of newborn babies.

Source: DailyMailUK


 

Comments

  1. Do Nigerian mum's perform the vaginal seeding after cs?

    ReplyDelete
  2. This is the first time I'm hearing of this. Don't think it's common in Nigeria

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is the first time I'm hearing of this. Don't think it's common in Nigeria

    ReplyDelete

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