RELATED STORIES

How to cook Minty Tomato Chicken Stew

A plate of rice with chicken tomato mint stew.
Tomato mint stew is cooked the same way you cook your normal tomato stew except that
here you add some mint leaves for that unique stew taste. This stew can be served with rice, pasta, boiled yam or plantain. It can be as thick or light as you want it. What makes the difference is the quantity of water used.
Boiling
chicken with salt and onion
Boil tomatoes until soft, about 20 minutes. Now adding pepper, onion  and tatashe to boiled tomato before blending alltogether. There was no pepper sauce at home so I cooked with fresh pepper
Fry for about 5 to 10  minutes. Frying blended Boiled tomatoes, onion, tatashe and pepper
Adding some fried tomato to chicken stock
Adding boiled chicken to frying tomato
Scooping out boiled chicken into frying tomatoes
Chicken is simmered in tomato stew
Ingredients for this mint stew;
2 kilos (Orobo) hard chicken
Salt to taste
Chicken stock
Knorr cubes to taste
1/2 teaspoon Curry powder
1 large Onion
1 tablepoon ground Pepper
1 tablespoon tatashey
1 small basket Tomatoes
Soya oil
1/2 bunch mint/scent leaves
Boiled chicken in tomato stew
Adding stock and mint leaves to stew
Mint (scent leaves boil in 
Boiled rice with chicken minty stew/soup


minty tomatoes stew, how thick it looked before I made it light
A plate of chicken mint stew
Rice and chicken mint stew/soup
Yummy chicken mint stew on boiled rice
Soft rice with minty stew
This stew /soup can be prepared with any vegetable of your choice, however, the best taste comes with mint leaves sprinkled sparingly.
Enjoy!

Comments

  1. Anonymous5/14/2013

    Yaay! first to comment. NICE ONE ! no drama on this nice food post please.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anonymous5/14/2013

    Nice one there. 2 questions where can I get the mint leaves and also why did you add the fried tomato to the chicken stock.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can get mint leaves at the open market. It's usually sold by the women who sell condiments for igbo soups. Just ask them for scent leaf. You can also get it at supermarkets like spar and shoprite, it's labelled mint leaves there.

      Delete
    2. My dear Anon, the tomato was getting too much for the fry pan and started to splash everywhere on the cooker, I had to reduce it that way.

      Delete
  3. Beautiful meal sis Eya. Can one cook this with fried fish? I love mint but too much of it can over power d taste of d food. U like plenty pepper, I counted like 7 hot peppers u cooked b4 blending.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Sister Lizzy. Yes you can cook with fried fish. I don't like too much mint leaves too that's why I added sparingly. It gives a very delicious taste when added sparingly.

      My sis, that pepper eh, when the kids saw it, they demanded I take some out or give them indomie noodles to eat. I had to take three out before blending.

      No, I only boiled the tomatoes o, the pepper and tatashe were added there when I was about to blend. I don't boil pepper and tatashe before blending.

      Delete
  4. I love that zest that mint gives to our tomato stew. Nice one, Eya.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Nice one aunty Ojay,looks yummy. Seems u love pepper asmuch as I do.lolz

    ~BONARIO~says so via NOKIA3310

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bona, so you like pepper? Your yansh go dey pepper you so oh. Sofly sofly oh Oga Bona.

      Delete
    2. Yes Bona, I love pepper but not too much.
      @Rubynnia!!!

      Delete
  6. I was so sure there was toothpaste in the recipe when I saw "minty" in the title! Thankfully not!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No Lurvemj, there's no toothpaste, it's mint leaves.

      Delete
  7. Anonymous5/14/2013

    Dry joke

    ReplyDelete
  8. Yay!
    I absolutely love adding mint leaves (nchanwu) to tomato stew. It gives it a very delicious flavour. Its also good way to transform old tomato stew you've had for a whyle. Kai, my mouth is watering seriosly here o.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    2. @ Chinyere thanks for the tips and for giving us the Igbo name.

      Delete
  9. the pix is inviting. looks yummy!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Nchanwu added in stew?neva heard of dt.wl try it.
    Thnks Aunty Eya

    ReplyDelete
  11. Yummy yummy, thanks Aunty Eya will try this out today.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Madam eya, pls how long do you boil the tomatoes before blending?
    Nice one, thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Anonymous5/15/2013

    Kai,anty eya,u dey try well well,ds belle wey I get no dey let me eat anythn,not even water,na so so spit n vomi for 3 months now,I for lik try out ds stew but#sobbing,wetin I go do,I go pass till am able to start eating again,walahi I luv d fact dat d chicken is not fried n d mint leaf too,nice one anty,kip d gd work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous5/15/2013

      Ukaa I see you...lol, dnt worry its a question of tym...Mma.

      Delete
  14. Anonymous5/15/2013

    please people of WC i dont want to come across as over sabi bt i have noticed that you people refer to scent leaves as "mint". Its actually called BASil LEAVES in english. It not the same as mint. Mint taste and smell sort of like toothpaste. Madam Eya please take note its scent leaves in pidgin, efirin in yoruba, nchanwu in igbo and Basil leaves in english. Thank you

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Click on the pictures to make them bigger.
Feel free to email us with comments, suggestions, recipe ideas, or pretty much anything!
Contact Email: cuulme@gmail.com

Most comments are by other blog readers. Always seek Professional Help First.
“As an Amazon Associate I earn a little commission when you shop from links placed on this blog.”

SHARE THIS POST

RELATED

SHOP HERE