Sunday, July 07, 2013

Banga Or Palm Kernel Soup By Dressed

A plate of real banga soup

Banga soup recipe

Hi, I saw a comment someone made recently about wanting Banga and Owo soup and as a correct Delta babe who makes the meanest Banga and
fairly good Owo I thought  ok why not share my own recipe. 

Ingredients for banga soup:

5 cups ripe Palm Kernel
1 medium Onion (chopped)
1kg Beef
Stock-fish (optional)
1 large size Dried fish
Fresh Peppers
1/4 cup Ground crayfish

Salt to taste
2 Knorr seasoning cubes
Banga Spices as shown in the pictures below
Water to boil the palm nuts


 Cooked Stock Fish and beef
 Smoked cat fish
 Crushed banga stick
These are the four Banga spices I used
 Ground Banga spices the alternative to whole Banga spices
 Sorry guys washed my Palm kernel before I realized I didn’t take the photo in its raw state
 Fresh Peppers ( You can use dry ground pepper,  I prefer the fresh taste I get from using a mix of roughly ground fresh red and yellow peppers)
 Banga Soup Cooking Method:
1.       Season and boil beef with your stock fish

2.       Boil your palm kernel until soft,  then pound in a mortar to squash but not hard enough to crack the nuts. Add some water and squeeze palm kernel to get the oil out, pour washed kernel  into a sieve to separate palm oil from the husk of the nuts. Keep adding water and washing out oil until all the oil is out of the nuts.  

3.       Pour washed  oil in a pot, place on the fire and allow to boil for about 30mins then add chopped onion, ground pepper and the stick (I usually crush my stick in a mortar to release the flavors before adding to the boiling soup),  then  cook for a further 15mins.

4.       Add your beef, stock fish and dried fish to boiling soup, depending on how dry your fish is, mine was quite dry so I put it at this stage.  If your fish is not very dry then you can wait until towards the end of the cooking to add it so there can still be some whole chunks. If using fresh fish, which is fantabolous with Banga soup you also add that towards the end of cooking so it doesn’t break up into tiny bits completely.  Allow to cook again for another 10mins.

5.       Add your ground spices, EXCEPT the dried bitter leaves . At this stage you would notice your Banga soup is getting thicker and that wonderful banga aroma (thanks to its unique spices) would have filled your whole house.  Allow to simmer for further  10mins.  Then Add your knorr cubes and salt to taste, ground crayfish and dried bitter leaves allow to simmer for 5mins and that’s all!
Boiling washed Banga 
 Adding stick
 Adding ground pepper
 Soup with fish and meat added
 Banga with all the spices added
 Alternatively you can chose to buy the already ground one, just ask the market women for ground banga spices they would sort you out,  although I prefer the flavours of the whole seeds)
Banga with all the spices added


 Sorry guys no fufu in the photo, I made this very early in the morning and there was  no plans of eating fufu at that time.
Bon Apetit!

Notes :  The  cooking time will vary depending on  how watery you wash your palm kernel nuts. It is usually shorter with canned kernel nut  (which is quite convenient but not the most nutritious.)  Nothing beats the taste of fresh palm kernel. The aim of cooking this long is to take off the oily taste of the nuts and to get a slightly thick soup, whatever cooking duration gives you this consistency is ok.

Dressed Blogs @ dressed 2 d nines

Happy cooking!
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58 comments:

  1. omg, so salivating. For interesting stories visit suspenseandemotions.blogspot.com

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  2. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

    @poster correct geh. Migwo.

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  3. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

    Which kain fufu,? na starch get ds one o

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  4. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

    Nice, nd when u add scent leaves nd ugu, u wil use it to eat rice.

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  5. Nice one bookmarked already,almost the same process used in preparing my Ofeakwu.

    ~BONARIO~says so via NOKIA3310

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    Replies
    1. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

      Mr Bonario, can u pls put up the recipe for ofeakwu. i would like to lean how to cook it. thanks

      Delete
  6. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

    Oh la la!...thanks Dressed, now I'm hungry. Pls who knows how to cook black soup. I think it's a delicacy from the south...very spicy with loads of pepper soup spices dried scent leaves. Someone pls help a sister with the recipee. Thanks in advance.

    ReplyDelete
  7. plz wat's d diff btw this and ofeakwu?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The difference is that you substitute beletete,regeje&otako for scent leave, ugu and okpenye/okpei
      Now I feel like eating Ofeakwu tomorrow then my Banga is a sure thing for Monday

      Delete
    2. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

      Nice one pls d stick is it meant to b left in d soup and all these spices can one find it in Lagos market?Someone kindly answer pls.

      Delete
    3. After cooking, you remove the stick. Me I wash it and reuse tho.
      Yes na, if you go to people selling local spices they will have or be able to direct you to the right place. Just buy the mixed one, its easier

      Delete
    4. @ Anon 3:04pm. thank you. taking out the stick is a matter of choice. I usually take mine out as I dish out my soup.

      dressed2dnines.blogspot.com

      Delete
    5. @ Anon 3:04pm yes you can find all the spices in Lagos, I live in Lagos and get everything from my local market. Just ask the market people

      dressed2dnines.blogspot.com

      Delete
  8. It's really Migwo. Dressed, wa doh...... This banga is so on point.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you :).

      dressed2dnines.blogspot.com

      Delete
  9. Yea @bonario but u use ogili instead of d spices

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  10. Say me Migwo to your mama, she tish you well and you be correct geh too *in Waffi tone*
    Na Monday I go enter this level, thank God say Igbudu market dey my domot. Meanwhile for people wen no know the spice name na Otaiko, Regeje and Beletete(the leaf). I dey prefer to buy the spice myself coz some of those mixing things dey dey adulterated but correct ones dey sha.
    Well done my geh but you need to dress2Dones to enjoy this soup o,lol.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. wow! thanks for sharing the names of the spices, now I know. And I agree with you about using whole spices over already ground ones.
      dressed2dnines.blogspot.com

      Delete
  11. Dish looks nice. Will send some Kenyan recipes to Eya so you peeps can learn some Kenyan dishes too.

    Lucinda

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    Replies
    1. Lucinda my mum is Kenyan and I love mandazi, iriyo, yamachoma, chapati with cabbage, meat, peas n carrots. Yum yum

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  12. Dish looks nice. Will send some Kenyan recipes to Eya so you peeps can learn some Kenyan dishes too.

    Lucinda

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    Replies
    1. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

      Can't wait to cook me some Kenyan dishes.

      Delete
  13. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

    All u need to add to this soup is 'ogiri okpei/ scent leaves and ugu' to turn it into ofe-akwu. I love banga and ofe akwu to death. @dressed I used to think fresh cat fish was the best to be used in cooking banga soup. My nearest mama-put uses only catfish and I bite my fingers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To be honest I think Banga soup is one soup where you can use practically anything. I use catfish or croaker fish sometimes.

      dressed2dnines.blogspot.com

      Delete
  14. Thanks for the 'fantabulous' recipe. Av actually been looking for aunthentic banga recipe, would try it out soon. Please do tutorial of how to prepare starch, for we non-waffis.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad you like it :). thank you

      dressed2dnines.blogspot.com

      Delete
  15. Thanks Dressed! I have never eaten this soup before but I learnt how to cook fron women in the market and my hub likes it. Problem is, since I have not tasted it anywhere else, I dnt know wat to compare mine to. Pls does anyone know a good place in Ph where I can buy it and taste? I tried Jevinik but they did not have it.

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    Replies
    1. Try Charcoal Restraunt in the GRA. Not too far jevenik that's there(GRA).

      Delete
  16. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

    Is ds nt biterleaf soup?

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    Replies
    1. Hi. no its not bitterleaf soup

      dressed2dnines.blogspot.com

      Delete
  17. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

    Is ds nt biterleaf soup?

    ReplyDelete
  18. 6abulsA friend taught me how to make this soup n I've never been disappointed each time I make it. BTW I only ever use canned kernel oil.

    ReplyDelete
  19. @adaeze try charcoal and spice at GRA. @ debie thanks for the real names of the spice, I was just about asking.
    Dressed, migwo. You have done well

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. I'm glad you like it.

      dressed2dnines.blogspot.com

      Delete
  20. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

    The only place I can think of now is Choba,just behind Agofure, Choba park.(Its a mama-put).
    Banga soup is best eaten in a native-fire-dried clay pot called Ewere.
    N.B: u may not like the the set up of this place I'm talking about but u can try it just for the taste, buy take-away..lol just to compare sha. However, if u use Otaiko and Rogoje(this one is the one wt the meanest aroma) and a little beletete or Bitter leaves (all dried), u will get a fair taste. Note that there are two types of Palm Nuts, Native and Agric, Native is light and sweeter, Agric is thick and just the average taste u know

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Visited this joint about 5 yrs ago while on transit and they did justice to d banga soup.
      And yes, you are right with d ewere pot, you cant beat d taste. cant wait to get mine shipped down....native tinz on my mind....lol
      Welldone poster! Correct soup!!

      Delete
    2. Very true about the clay pots :), And the 2 types of palm nuts. I usually mix both so I can get the benefits from both i.e thickness (From the Agric) and fuller flavour (from the native).

      dressed2dnines.blogspot.com

      Delete
  21. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

    *a fair taste when its ur first time*, u get better at it. All the best

    ReplyDelete
  22. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

    What's d differenc btw ds one nd bitterleaf soup?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Are you for real???

      Delete
  23. AnonymousJuly 06, 2013

    pls i would like to know the name of the spices as you did not mention them in your write up. thanks. And also what is that stick? ive never seen or heard of it before. pls enlighten me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi. check out Debbie's comment about the names of the spices.

      dressed2dnines.blogspot.com

      Delete
  24. Omg.......i wanttttt. Booked marked already.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad you like :)

      dressed2dnines.blogspot.com

      Delete
  25. I love you already*lool,tanx for dis!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. :). You welcome


      dressed2dnines.blogspot.com

      Delete
  26. Waoooo! The much talked banga soup! Yummy me likey! I must look out for the spices and try it out someday.if u supstitute the spices with ehuru, okpei and nchuanwu u get my best ofeakwu!

    ReplyDelete
  27. Why is this post untop again...
    Is this a miracle, or auty eya wants Pope Francis to make her a saint also?

    Anyway! Still mussing...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. AnonymousJuly 07, 2013

      Lool,you goT me looling!!!

      Delete
    2. AnonymousJuly 07, 2013

      tot d same.lolzz

      Delete
    3. Ace oooooo lol. I thought I was seeing things when I saw this post on top. So my sight is not failing afterall.

      Delete
  28. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  29. Hello, please the banga stick, I heard it is called Oburunbebe stick in Urhobo.. Please is this stick the SAME peppery flavoured stick used as chewing-sticks or in agbo - herbal medicine by Yorubas? Please I'd appreciate your response.

    ReplyDelete
  30. I love this soup! with soft hot eba, i can give out all i have just to eat it.

    ReplyDelete

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